My @Tearfund #meanbeanchallenge

A lot of the world goes to bed hungry. It’s something not many in our country can imagine (although with the rise in the need of food banks perhaps more than in the past). I certainly struggle to get my head round it.

Which is partly why I am taking part in Tearfund ‘ s mean bean challenge. You can still sponsor me if you like.
The other reason is that Tearfund know what they are doing and can be trusted to use the money we all raise well.

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Yesterday was the first day and it was SO HARD. I hadn’t anticipated the sugar and caffeine withdrawal and it wasn’t fun. And I was hungry. And fed up.
I mean, I’m a vegan, I eat rice, beans or both every day. And it was still really hard.

First world problems. Seriously, I’m doing this for five days and then I go back to abundance.

Unlike all those women, children and men who use all their days just to survive. No one should have to live like that. While I temporarily long for fresh vegetables, fruits and nuts, spices and a nice cup of tea…
They long for the rice and beans I’m fed up with already.

I have raised money for people like Tearfund before, but this has really hit me. Imagine it was my family, my community going though this.

Although i will finish my rice and bean challenge on Friday and enjoy my Saturday porridge with koko coconut milk and dates, I won’t stop thinking about this, and putting some of my time and money into it as well.

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Global warning: a repost from #40acts

This action and it’s blog post couldn’t be more important, I reccomend it to you:

Act 21: Global warning

Creation is in trouble. Scientists predict new global crises every other day, and our governments are under increasing pressure to do something about it. But really, much of the problem lies with us. Small things, every day, make a difference. It’s the difference between leaving a legacy of destruction and ensuring life for those who come after us.

Read today’s blog by Emma Greenwood from Liberti Magazine and pick your actions:
http://www.40acts.org.uk/the-challenge/global-warning

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We want to know: what are you going to change? Got any green tips for us and your fellow 40activists? Simply use #40acts on social media, send us an email, or text your videos/photos to +447468404040 via WhatsApp. We’ll feature them on our weekly 40acts LIVE broadcast!

@Number10gov shows total disregard for #democracy

I used to be the kind of average middle class citizen that believed in government and supporting our national leaders.
I have always voted and enouraged others to participate in the democratic process (and will continue to do so).

But now I am beginnjng to wonder if I even live in a democracy.

Truly, can this government get any worse? They disregard the poor, even though five months ago they said they wouldnt, ignore the mentally ill and are now showing a China like attitude to democracy.

Doesn’t this scare anyone else?

Right now our government is putting into law what we are allowed to protest or not.

And this is not just about Israel, it’s about weapons, tobacco and fossil fuels. Read this from the independent:

“Under the plan all publicly funded institutions will lose the freedom to refuse to buy goods and services from companies involved in the arms trade, fossil fuels, tobacco products or Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank….
…The only exemption will be UK-wide sanctions decided by the Government in Westminster.”

You can see the full article here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/israel-boycott-local-councils-public-bodies-and-student-unions-to-be-banned-from-shunning-israeli-a6874006.html

We live in worrying times.

September 2015 David Cameron says they won’t scrap.the funding for free school meals.

This month news comes out that the funding for free school meals is being scrapped.

The government’s own task force reveals the appalling state of mental health provision in our country.

Visualising wealth inequality in Britain

This is such an important study. The next question being of course… what do we DO about it?

The Earthbound Report

Inequality in Britain has been rising for 30 years. If current trends continue, we will be back to the inequality of the Victorian age within 20 years. That’s the message behind Inequality Briefing, which launched this short video summary of the problem yesterday.

It’s interesting that the video includes what we think inequality should look like – we know that there has to be some, and that absolute inequality is not the goal. The fact that the reality is so far from what we’d expect ought to be a bit of a wake-up to politicians content to ignore the issue.

The more people are aware of just how extreme inequality is  becoming, the harder it will be for it to be ignored, so please share the video around.

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We need an inquiry into food banks: My column in today’s Guardian.

Who in all conscience could vote Conservative having read their responses to food banks in this article…

Jack Monroe

Food banks are not new, nor news. Commenters on all sides are quick to point out that they first sprang up under the last Labour government, but the need for them has increased dramatically since the introduction of the bedroom tax in April, and harsh sanctions for benefit claimants. The latest figures from the Trussell Trust show that demand for food banks is still increasing. In George Osborne’s ‘war on welfare’, the only casualties are those at the very bottom. But this is not a war. It is an assault against the unarmed, a massacre of hope and dignity.
Edwina Currie recently commented that she had “no sympathy” for food bank users, that they were just “rational” opportunists. I attempted to point out that food bank users had to be referred by a health visitor or social services or other agency for help, but she refused to hear it.

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Currie…

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On the many ways to be poor

The Earthbound Report

As I write about a just and sustainable economy, one of the enduring problems is our limited definition of wealth. We tend of think of it almost invariably in monetary terms, drawing up ‘Rich Lists*’ and calculating GDP, measuring the success of individuals and the progress of nations through the blunt instrument of financial increase. In reality, money is just one part of what makes life worth living, and that true wealth lies in relationships and belonging, satisfying work and leisure, and a host of other things.

We all know this of course, but somehow it doesn’t seem to filter through. Politicians can stand up and declare that growing the economy is their number one priority, and nobody questions the idea. If they were to say instead that the primary goal of government was going to increasing our collective wellbeing, I imagine they’d be dismissed as ‘wooly thinkers’.

The need…

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